Posts related to James Fergusson

James Fergusson (1621-1667) was minister of Kilwinning. He was the author of very highly regarded commentaries on Scripture. C H Spurgeon described them as those of “a grand, gracious, savoury divine”. He had many fears concerning his own state at his death. Alexander Nisbet urged him to depend upon God’s promises. Fergusson began to say “Into thy hand I commit my spirit” and stopped without going further. Nisbet said, “Say on, brother!” “Oh, may I say, for thou hast redeemed me?”, Fergusson replied. “It’s a great matter for me to say it”. A staunch presbyterian, he preached faithfully against government domination of the Church. He wrote in defence of presbyterian principles and the spiritual independence of the Church’s government from civil government.

Jun 21

Why Face-to-Face Communication is a Biblical Priority

In our digital world, relationships have also become digital. Sometimes this brings the benefit of making those who are far away near but it can also have the disbenefit of making those who are near, far away. Sometimes we see people in the same physic …

May 3

Is the Desire to Sin, Sinful?

It may sound like a speculative question but a moment’s reflection confirms that it is intensely practical. Can someone disclaim responsibility for their desires to sin? Perhaps they would claim that those desires are part and parcel of a fallen world …

Apr 18

Remember How Christ’s Ascension Keeps on Giving?

For some reason we don’t seem to speak much about Christ’s ascension to heaven. It’s a key but neglected doctrine. Which is strange because it connects with the present glory and work of Christ. It also has everything to do with the current status and …

Mar 22

Keep Calm in An Age of Anger

We’re getting angrier, about a lot of things. It’s the dominant emotion in western societies on a daily basis. That hothouse of anger–social media–is even more ablaze with rage (according to a new study). Frustration and moral outrage explode against a …

Mar 1

Making the Best Use of Time in the Worst of Times

For many of us it seems like time equals pressure. We’re “pressed for time” because there’s less available than what we need to fulfil our “pressing priorities”. It seems like time gets away from us and there’s never enough to achieve everything. Appre …